@rndm/test-gen
A test generation too for removing boiler plate unit test writing.
Last updated a year ago by paul.j.napier .
Apache-2.0 · Repository · Bugs · Original npm · Tarball · package.json
$ cnpm install @rndm/test-gen 
SYNC missed versions from official npm registry.

RNDM Test Generator

About

When it comes to writing code, it is important to ensure you have a good level of tests. However, writing tests is one of the most laborious processes. This is why we designed the RNDM Test Generator.

RNDM Test Generator is a simple NPM module that can easily be integrated with any React Project. After installation, if code is written in a clean way then the test generation tool will kick in, build out tests and generate snapshots that can provide a base line for all future tests. What is more, the tool includes code coverage reports that will kick in immediately.

So with one simple command (npm run cover), you can go from a position of no tests to every file tested and extremely high code coverage. Let's take a look at how this works!

Requirements

RNDM Test Generator has the following dev dependencies:

  • @rndm/babel-node-modules
  • chai
  • chai-as-promised
  • mocha
  • mocha-parallel-tests
  • nyc
  • proxyquire
  • sinon
  • sinon-chai

Installation

From NPM

npm install --save-dev @rndm/test-gen

Inside your package.json file, add or amend the test script:

"test": "mocha \"./__tests__/unit/**/*.spec.js\" --opts ./__tests__/unit/_setup/mocha.opts"

Please Note: This can also be any other script name you choose. We have set it as test for simplicity. If you do use a different script name then remember to use this later in the code coverage script.

Setup Files

After installation, the configuration requires a couple of setup files in order to run smoothly. First create a folder called _setup inside you test folder. e.g.

mkdir __tests__/unit/_setup

The add the following files:

  • mocha.opts
  • polyfill.js
  • index.js

mocha.opts

This file is the options you will want to pass across to the mocha test runner. We use a few simple options here but for further documentation, you can visit the Mocha Documentation here.

The options we will include are as below:

--require @babel/register
--reporter spec
--recursive
--timeout 10000
--require __tests__/unit/_setup/index.js

Copy and paste these into the mocha.opts file you created.

polyfill.js

This file allows us to make use of Babel to polyfill the @rndm/test-gen on the run (as it is ignored by the babel transpiler by default). In this file, simply add the one line as below:

require('@rndm/babel-node-modules')(['@rndm/test-gen']);

index.js

The index file is the one that will run all the underlying code for generating specs, serialised tests and the corresponding snapshot files. In here simply add the following lines of code to start the process running:

import './polyfill';
import { generate } from '@rndm/test-gen';
generate();

Congratulations! You can now run your tests via the command-line with the simple command:

npm test

And all the respective files will be built (or errors thrown for invalid code ????)

Usage

Config

After the initial installation, it is extremely simple to setup and run and does not require any additional configuration. However, there are a number of useful options available for making your experience easier. If you do need these, then there are two options for integration into your application: package.json, or .rtgrc.json file. The below instructions will cover tools for integration and the keys in both can be used either inside package.json under the key "rtg" or within the .rtgrc.json file.

Please Note: The package.json will take precedence over any configurations duplicated inside the .rtgrc.json file. So it is better to decide on using one of these options to avoid this causing unexpected results. directory

This is the directory in which you will have your unit tests. It is relative to your project.

Type: String (relative path)

Default Value: "__tests__/unit"

Example:

"directory": "__tests__/unit"

sendStats (IMPORTANT!!)

In order to improve our product, we send certain anonymous statistics such as usage reports and the version of @rndm/test-gen you are currently using. These stats help us to understand our users better, build out awesome features for the future, and are completely non-intrusive and anonymous.

By default, this inclusion is set as an 'opt-out' feature, but it is extremely simple to opt out inside your options should you prefer.

Type: Boolean

Default Value: true

Example:

"sendStats": false

ignoreNodes

RNDM Test Generator reviews and requires modules as it needs to evaluate the output that should be resolved inside snapshots. When it does this, it can sometimes stub modules that it doesn't actually want to. Examples of this could be lodash or react, which provide important functionality for your app. Therefore this configuration option allows you to define nodes that you really want to run when testing so that you get the output you expect. By default The configuration ignores the following nodes:

  • react
  • lodash
  • babel-runtime
  • chai
  • chai-as-promised
  • enzyme
  • enzyme-adapter-react-16
  • sinon
  • sinon-chai
  • fs
  • path

Type: Array(module name)

Default Value: []

Example:

"ignoreNodes": [
  "fs-extra"
]

include

Out of the box, RNDM Test Generator will try to test every JavaScript file under your src folder. However, if you only want to test certain files, you can override this by using the include key. This allows you to provide paths to directories (and recursive sub directories) or files that will be added to your test suite.

Type: Array(path)

Default Value: []

Example:

"include": [
  "src/app",
  "src/index.js"
]

This will test all JavaScript files in src/app and all sub directories, as well as index.js in the src folder, but ignore all other folders and files.

exclude

Like the above option, exclude gives more control over what will be added to your test suite. This can be used either independently or in conjunction with the include option to remove the items you don't want tested.

Type: Array(path)

Default Value: []

Example:

"include": [
  "src/external",
  "src/index.js"
]

This will exclude all files in the external folder as well as the index.js file in the src folder, but will run tests against all other js files inside the src folder.

map

In RNDM Test Generator, it is possible to map some of your existing functionality into your other tests. For example if you have styles.js file, you might want this to provide results to your React components rather than be stubbed. In this case, you can provide a mapping function that will be picked up by the test library when running your tests to give the expected results.

Type: Array(Maps)

Default Value: []

Example:

"map": [
  {
    "find": "styles",
    "to": "app/styles/index.js"
  }
]

In the above example, we are mapping any import that imports the styles file to the correct file in your application.

relative

If you are looking to include RNDM Test Generator as a library inside your project folder, rather than as a module. This flag will allow all the files generated to be run relative to this project. It is rare that you will need to do this. However, it is a flag that we have used since we dog-food this inside of the RNDM Test Generator package. (Yes we believe so much in our product that it is used to run tests directly on itself! For if you are interested, checkout the dogfood.js file inside of the test setup folder to see how we do this)

Type: Boolean

Default Value: false

Example:

"relative": true

Run Options

Run options are those options provided at run-time to the test suite.

removeSnapshots

The remove snapshots option allows you to delete any unused or old snapshots automatically. It receives an enum of values: true | 'all' | 'unused' | false

true/'all': This will remove all snapshots prior to running your test suite. This is an option you might want to use where there have been widespread changes to your code and you want to rebase your tests on the new code whilst dereferencing old snapshots.

'unused': This will remove any old and unused snapshots during your test run.

false (default value): This will leave existing snapshots untouched.

Type: Boolean

Default Value: false

Example:

//Inside your setup file (setup/index.js):

generate({ removeSnapshots: 'unused' });

NYC

Under the covers (pun intended), RNDM Test Generator makes use of Istanbul and NYC for code coverage. In order to understand more about this suite of tools, you can view their documentation here.

To make use of this, you can add the following script in your package.json file:

"cover": "nyc --check-coverage npm test"

However, there are a few items that you'll want to include in your NYC config. The below code is an example config, that will allow an easy integration into the rndm-react-xp:

"nyc": {
    "lines": 70,
    "include": [
      "src/**/*.js"
    ],
    "exclude": [
      "src/**/*.flow.js",
      "src/web",
      "src/index.js",
      "src/index.native.js",
      "flow-typed"
    ],
    "require": [
      "babel-core/register"
    ],
    "all": true,
    "sourceMap": false,
    "instrument": false
  }

This can be copied into your package,json file, but bear in mind that your code may be significantly different from this template, and may require further options to allow integration.

Output Files

Specs

Location

Within the context of RNDM Test Generator, specs are the JavaScript files that can run your tests. These are by default very simple file. When created by the library, they will be created under the folder {test path}/src. Each test file corresponds to the file path and file name within each of the folders included in your source code.

For example if you have a folder structure that looks like the below:

src/
  index.js
  app/
    index.js
    Component.js

The the corresponding spec files will look like this:

__tests_/unit/src/
  index.spec.js
  app/
    index.spec..js
    Component.spec..js

You will see this continuation of names throughout the output files so as to keep the process simpler.

Basic Usage

A spec file in its simplest form will contain only 4 lines:

import { describe } from '@rndm/test-gen'; // The importing of the test generator code
import generated from '../_rtg_/_tests/index'; // The path to the corresponding serialised tests
const tests = generated; // A reassignment (we will cover this in a later section)
describe(tests); // the running of the tests

Intermediate Usage

We will discuss the composition of the serialised tests shortly, but for now, it is good to know that you can override the tests that are being passed into the describe function within this spec file. For example, you can add additional scenarios not automatically detected by the test generator as below:

const tests = {
  ...generated,
  "default": [
    ...generated.default,
   {},
  ],
};

Advanced Usage

In essence the spec files are just simple spec files and can be used in the same way as any other mocha spec files. As such, if you want to add your own describe, it or expect functions, you can do so at the base level. However, the RNDM Test Generator also allows you to define these at various levels within the tests object.

For instance you are able to include:

  • context functions under a context key in the base level, e.g.:
const tests = {
  ...generated,
  "context": () => context('it has a context', () => {
    it('should run a test', () => {
      expect(true).to.equal(true)
    });
  }),
};
  • it functions at a context level within the array, e.g.:
const tests = {
  ...generated,
  "context": [
      () => {
      it('should run a test', () => {
        expect(true).to.equal(true)
      });
    },
  ],
};

Play around with what you can and cannot do and should there be a a feature you specifically require, feel free to ask or submit a pull request for us to review.

Tests

Tests take the form of a serialised JSON file named the same as the original file and placed in the same file structure under a folder called _rtg/tests/ inside the unit test folder. When run through the describe function, these are analysed and executed. Upon initial run, the RNDM Test Generator will review the source directory to build out the basic tests for each of the exports from each source file.

Basic Test

In its simplest form a JSON auto generated test would look like the below examples:

{
  "default": [
    {}
  ]
}

The breakdown of the above is that the initial object contains keys that point to named export from the file under test. For example should we have a the below as a piece of code:

// src/example.js

export const named = "this is a named export";

export default "this is a default export";

The generated test file would be:

// __tests__/unit/_rtg/src/example.json

{
  "default": [
    {}
  ],
  "named": [
    {}
  ]
}

Options: path

The path that the test will take to find the Subject Under Test (SUT). When default, the SUT will be the object itself. If another path is provided, then the test will be run against the element at the end of the path.

Type: String

Default Value: "default"

Example:

Given an the object below:

{
  example: () => true
}

A standard test either without the path option or the path option set to "default" will test the object itself. However, should you wish to test the output of the example path, this can be done by setting the test as below:

{
  "default": [
    {
      "path": "example"
    }
  ]
}

Paths are '.' delimited, so you are able to specify deep paths for testing e.g. "example.example.1.example"

Options: expected

The type of expectation we will use. For full expectation paths visit the Automattic website here. By default, this will output to a snapshot file, described in the section below.

Type: String

*Default Value: "to.matchSnapshot"

Options: expectation

Should a the expected option above require an actual expectation, this can be provided here.

Type: Any

Default Value: undefined

Options: args

An array of arguments that can be passed into either a function or a class when executing.

Type: Array(Any) | ARGObject

Default Value: undefined

Arg Array

When creating an arguments array you can think of these as each of the items that will be passed into a function or the construction of a class.

Example: Simple

function add(a, b) {
    return a + b
}

export default add

The function above allows us to add two numbers together. In this instance, the args are the two parameters we are passing across. So we could write a test as below:

{
    "default": [
        {
            "args": [
                1,
                2
            ]
        }
    ]
}

This would create a snapshot that would create the test expectation with the output of 3.

Example: Advanced

Sometimes, however, we have more complex functions that might take something that is not able to be serialised such as another function. In this instance, it makes sense to promote the test out of the JSON and into the JavaScript .spec.js file.

function curryMathFunctionThenAdd(fn, a, b) {
    return fn(a, b) + a + b
}

export default curryMathFunctionThenAdd;

The above function takes another argument here that will also do something with the arguments before adding them together with that input. So here we will want to pass our own function in to test it.

const tests = {
    default: [
        {
            args: [
                (a, b) => (a * b),
                1,
                3,
            ],
        },
    ],
};

describe(tests);

The output of this will be a snapshot that will take the arguments of 1 and 3, pass them into the first function argument and multiply them to give the output of 3, then add them together to create a value expectation of 7.

ARGObject

Since there can be many sub-levels of execution, it is also possible to write an object style approach to arguments. The shape of the expected object is:

current

Type: Array(Any)

Default Value: undefined

This is the same as the Arg Array above

stubs

Type: Object

Default Value: undefined

This will set values on the instance created for the next level of execution. We will cover this in depth in the next section.

next

Type: NextObject

Default Value: undefined

This is for the next level of execution. and contains two properties:

path

Type: String

Default Value: "default"

The path of the item you would like to test.

spy

Type: String

Default Value: undefined

If you would prefer to test a context path, rather than the value output, you can do this using 'spy'. This will override the 'expectation' property.

Example:

Subject File

class MyClass extends Component {
    state = {
        mounted: false
    };

    componentDidMount() {
        this.setState({ mounted: true });
    }
}

export default MyClass;

Test File

{
    "default": [
        {
            "spy": "state",
            "args": {
                "current": [
                    {}
                ],
                 "next": {
                     "path": "componentDidMount",
                     "args": []
                 }
            }
        }
    ]
}

The above code, will spy in the context state property, rather than the output of 'componentDidMount()', which would be undefined.

args

Type: Array(Any) | ARGObject

Default Value: undefined

See above.

Example:

class MyClass {
    shouldAdd = false;

    constructor(c) {
        this.c = c;
    }

    mathsFunction = (a, b) => this.shouldAdd ? a + b + c : a - b - c;
}

export default MyClass;

In the code above, we have a class containing two properties, one set by the constructor and one statically set at the time of construction. it also contains the function we want to test called 'mathsFunction'. The purpose of this function is to add the input and the value called c together if the shouldAdd value is true or subtract if it is false.

{
    "default": [
        {
            "args": {
                "current": [
                    2
                ],
                 "next": {
                     "path": "mathsFunction",
                     "args": [
                         4,
                         6
                     ]
                 }
            },
            "stubs": {
                "shouldAdd": true
            }
        }
    ]
}

The test above we take the first arguments contained in the current block and pass them into the class constructor. It will then set the shouldAdd to true before executing the next path item "mathsFunction" with the arguments of 4 and 6.

Options: stubs

An Object defined the stubbed classes you want to provide and the output you want to return for the stubbed properties. Stubs are available at each of the main levels of the tests. These can be set as below:

Global Stubs

You are able to overwrite the automated stubs by providing values to a global parameter called stubs. In order to do this cleanly, it is a good idea to create a file or suite of files for your stubs then import this into your setup file.

It should be noted here that it is possible from file level to test level stubs to also stub out paths to relative imported files as well as imported node modules, i.e.:

Node Module: 'my-module';

Relative File: './my-module'; (the relativity is based on the relativity to the source file and not the test file)

Example

global.stubs = {
  'name-of-package-to-stub': {
    stubKey: 'stubValue',
  },
};
File-private Stubs

File private stubs are declared inside the file you wish to use them within. The can then be passed into the test as the second parameter.

Example

const stubs = {
  'name-of-package-to-stub': {
    stubKey: 'stubValue',
  },
};

const tests = ...;
describe(tests, stubs);

Describe Stubs

Describe stubs will be used within the context of the tests that are being run. This is useful where multiple describes are run within the same file. In this instance, they are wrapped within the '@options' special key, that is excluded from the test contexts.

Example

const tests = {
  '@options': {
    stubs: {
      'name-of-package-to-stub': {
        stubKey: 'stubValue',
      },
    },
  },
  default: [
    {}
  ]
};
describe(tests);

Context Stubs

Context stubs follow a similar pattern to describe stubs, and will be used for all tests within the context. However, when making use of these, you will need to amend the structure of the context from an array to an object, and wrap the tests with 'tests' key.

Example

const tests = {
  default: {
    '@options': {
      stubs: {
        'name-of-package-to-stub': {
          stubKey: 'stubValue',
        },
      },
    },
    tests: [
      {},
    ],
  },
};
describe(tests);

Note: In the future these @option objects will be used to pass other contextual parameters across. Currently, one other parameter is available 'only': true, which will limit the test running to any context that includes the only option.

Test Stubs

Test stubs allow you to stub out packages and files only for the duration of the test you are running. These are included as a direct parameter inside the test, as with other options discussed here.

Example

const tests = {
  default: [
    {
      stubs: {
        'name-of-package-to-stub': {
          stubKey: 'stubValue',
        },
      },
    },
  ],
};
describe(tests);

Execution Stubs

Execution stubs are stubs that can be passed in to mock values on a test subject. This is useful for when you need a property to be set different to the default value within the previous created object when creating testing the next level.

class MyComponent extends Component {
    g = "ff"

    constructor(props) {
        super(props);

        const { r, b } = props;

        this.state = {
            r,
            b,
        }
    }

    render() {
        const { r, b } = this.state;
        const { g } = this;
        return (
            <View style={{
                width: 50,
                height: 50,
                backgroundColor: `#${r}${g}${b}` }}
            />
        );
    }
};

export default MyComponent;

In the above class we have a React Component. This has a render function that we would like to test with different values for the state object including the red and blue values of our background colour. However, we also want to test our non state controlled green property.

{
    "default": [
        {
            "args": {
                "current": [
                    {
                        "r": "ff",
                        "b": "ff"
                    }
                ]
            },
            "stubs": {
                "g": "00"
            },
            "next": {
                "path": "render",
                "args": []
            }
        }
    ]
}

The test will test the React Component as a snapshot and has allowed us to ensure that we are using this.g property as part of our backgroundViewColor.

IMPORTANT

Stubs are hierarchical and non-destructive. This means that they follow a cascading merge order, but do not remove stubs that are not included in the lower levels.

Example

Given the below objects:

const autoStubs = {
  a: {
    b: true,
  },
};

const globalStubs = {
  b: {
    b: true,
  },
};

const fileStubs = {
  a: {
    a: true,
    b: false,
  },
};

const describeStubs = {
  a: {
    a: false,
  },
};

const contextStubs = {
  c: {
    a: true,
  },
};

const testStubs = {
  c: {
    a: false,
  },
};

We will end up with the following stub object that will be processed by the framework:

const stubs = {
  a: {
    a: false,
    b: false,
  },
  b: {
    b: true,
  },
  c: {
    a: false,
  },
};

Options: returnDefault

Used when you want to differentiate between exports in the file (should a file contain more than one export)

Type: Boolean

Default Value: false

Options: stringifyFunctions

USed when you require the functions to be included in the key for the snapshots. This is useful for whenever you have multiple dynamic stubs which otherwise would be missed by the JSON stringification.

Type: Boolean

Default Value: false

Options: it

An optional way of passing in a standard it function test.

Type: Function

Default Value: undefined

Options: description

An optional description to override the automated description.

Type: Boolean

Default Value: false

Options: identifiers

An object with key values to be included in the snapshot. This can be used for assisting with identification such as titles, ids, or other descriptions.

Type: Object

Default Value: {}

Snapshots

Snapshots are a powerful tool for generating the output of a test. On initial execution, the output is rendered into a JSON file under the description key. Upon further executions, you are able to compare the test results against this initial baseline and make decisions as to whether you want to edit the output, the test or the original source file. We opted to use JSON as the file type, since it is simple to use with the context of JavaScript.

Example:

// WelcomeMessage.js

import React from 'react';
import { Text } from 'react-native';

const WelcomeMessage = ({ style = {} } = {}) => (
  <Text style={style}>Welcome to RNDM React Cross Platform (XP)</Text>
);

export default WelcomeMessage;

// Test File: WelcomeMessage.json

{
  "default": [
    {
      "args": []
    }
  ]
}

// Snapshot File: WelcomeMessage.json

{
  "default.default with [] is expected to.matchSnapshot": {
    "value": {
      "key": null,
      "ref": null,
      "props": {
        "style": {},
        "children": "Welcome to RNDM React Cross Platform (XP)"
      },
      "_owner": null,
      "_store": {}
    }
  }
}

Current Tags

  • 0.2.9                                ...           latest (a year ago)

26 Versions

  • 0.2.9                                ...           a year ago
  • 0.2.8                                ...           a year ago
  • 0.2.7                                ...           a year ago
  • 0.2.6                                ...           a year ago
  • 0.2.5                                ...           a year ago
  • 0.2.4                                ...           a year ago
  • 0.2.3                                ...           a year ago
  • 0.2.2                                ...           a year ago
  • 0.2.1                                ...           a year ago
  • 0.2.0                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.15                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.14                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.13                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.12                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.11                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.10                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.9                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.8                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.7                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.6                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.5                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.4                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.3                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.2                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.1                                ...           2 years ago
  • 0.1.0                                ...           2 years ago
Maintainers (1)
Downloads
Today 1
This Week 1
This Month 1
Last Day 0
Last Week 0
Last Month 0
Dependencies (14)
Dependents (1)

Copyright 2014 - 2017 © taobao.org |