@defunctzombie/koa-autorouter
Autorouter creates a koa router from a hierarchy of files and folders. A route is defined by the location and name of a file within a file system tree rather than string names in your application logic.
Last updated 8 months ago by defunctzombie .
BlueOak-1.0.0 · Original npm · Tarball · package.json
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koa-autorouter

Autorouter creates a koa router from a hierarchy of files and folders. A route is defined by the location and name of a file within a file system tree rather than string names in your application logic.

This module helps me organize my code and routes into smaller logic components while redicing boilerplate to create routers manually.

import Router from '@defunctzombie/koa-autorouter';

const app = new Koa();

const router = new Router({
    root: '/path/to/routes/folder',
})
app.use(router.middleware());

Defining Routes

A route is defined by a file under the routes folder. Files should default export a function which will accept a Route instance on which you can attach handlers to specific HTTP verbs.

Below is an example with two routes: An index route and a status-endpoint route. The index route will receive requests for / and the status-endpoint route will receive requests for /status-endpoint.

/
/index.ts
/status-endpoint.ts

Looking at index.ts

import { Route } from '@defunctzombie/autorouter';

export default (route: Route) => {
    route.get(async (req, res) => {
        res.body = 'Hello World!';
    });
}

And status-endpoint.ts

import { Route } from '@defunctzombie/autorouter';

export default (route: Route) => {
     route.get(async (req, res) => {
        res.body = {
            health: 'good',
        }
     });
};

The Route interface supports all HTTP Verbs (get, put, ...). Here we have defined routes which only support GET requests. If we wanted to support other verbs we would need to invoke the appropriate methods on the route instance.

req and res are the Request and Response instances from the koa context. See the koa documentation on appropriate methods and parameters when accessing those objects.

Parameterized Routes

A parameterized route is a route where part of the url can vary and is not known during route setup. An example would be the route /posts/1234. Here 1234 could be the post ID yet we do not know this ID when we setup our routes.

To define a parameterized route, use [parameterName] when naming the file. For our posts example, we would create a route file posts/[postId].ts. The router will understand [postId] indicates a parameterized route and pass requests to our route.

The route setup is defined as:

export default (route: Route<{ postId: string }>) {
    route.get(async (req, res) => {
        // echo the post id
        res.body = {
            postId: req.params.postId,
        }
    });
}

Notice the additional { postId: string} generic argument to our Route type. This indicates the request expects a parameter called postId. The req instance will be extended with the parameter type inforamtion.

GOTCHA: The request parameter generic argument is not type validated against the route filename. You must ensure the parameter name in the file path matches the argument name.

Passthrough Routes

A passthrough route (aka middleware) is defined by invoking the use method on the route instance.

For example - we want to make sure that all routes under /foo contain a specific header. We would create a route file at foo/index.ts under our route root and implement the use method.

import { Route } from '@defunctzombie/autorouter';

export default (route: Route<{ postId: string }>) {
    route.use(async (req, res, next) => {
        if (!req.get('my-header')) {
            res.status = 403;
            return;
        }
        await next();
    });
}

Ignoring Test Files

If you co-locate your tests with your routes, as shown in this repo under the test-routes folder, you will use the ignorePattern Router option.

const router = new Router({
    root: '/path/to/routes/folder',
    ignorePattern: 'test.ts',
})

The ignorePattern option tests file paths against the regex pattern. If the file path matches, the file is ignored by the router.

Requirements

This module is built with typescript and requires nodejs 10.3+ for ES2018 support.

Typescript declaration support is included.

License

BlueOak-1.0.0

Current Tags

  • 2.0.1                                ...           latest (8 months ago)

3 Versions

  • 2.0.1                                ...           8 months ago
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  • 1.0.0                                ...           a year ago
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