@adobe/redux-saga-promise
Create actions that return promises, which are resolved/rejected by a redux saga
Last updated 7 months ago by ronen .
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@adobe/redux-saga-promise

Simple clean utility to define actions that return promises, for use with redux-saga

Overview

The library provides:

  • An action creator, createPromiseAction() that you can use to define actions which return promises. We call an action that returns a promise a promise action.

  • Saga helpers implementPromiseAction(), resolvePromiseAction(), andrejectPromiseAction() that you use to resolve or reject a promise action's promise.

  • Lifecyle actions promise.trigger, promise.resolved, and promise.rejected that you can use in reducers (or wherever)

  • Middleware that makes it work.

  • For convenience, an optional saga "effect creator" dispatch() to simplify dispatching promise actions and ordinary actions from within sagas.

These are described in detail below.

Installation

As usual, install via:

npm install @adobe/redux-saga-promise

Usage

Including the middleware:

You must include include promiseMiddleware in the middleware chain, and it must come before sagaMiddleware:

import { applyMiddleware, createStore } from 'redux'
import { promiseMiddleware }            from '@adobe/redux-saga-promise'
import createSagaMiddleware             from 'redux-saga'

// ...assuming rootReducer and rootSaga are defined
const sagaMiddleware = createSagaMiddleware()
const store          = createStore(rootReducer, {}, applyMiddleware(promiseMiddleware, sagaMiddleware))
sagaMiddleware.run(rootSaga)

Creating a promise action:

Create a promise action using createPromiseAction, analogous to createAction of redux-actions:

import { createPromiseAction } from '@adobe/redux-saga-promise'

export const myAction = createPromiseAction('MY_ACTION')

Behind the scenes, createPromiseAction uses createAction to define FSA-compliant actions. It also accepts payload and meta as optional second and third arguments, same as createAction. (And, like createAction, technically createPromiseAction returns an action creator rather than an action.)

Dispatching a promise action:

Dispatch a promise action normally, and dispatch() will return a promise:

import myAction from './myAction'

// In an ordinary function...
function () {
  ...
  dispatch(myAction(payload)).then(value => ...).catch(error => ...)
  ...
}

// In an async function....
async function () {
  try {
    const value = await dispatch(myAction(payload))
    ...
  } catch (error) {
    ...
  }
}

Resolving/rejecting the action in a saga:

It is up to you as the implementer to resolve or reject the promise's action in a saga. There are three helpers you can use as needed:

implementPromiseAction(action, saga)

The most convenient way! You give this helper a saga function which it will execute. If the saga function succesfully returns a value, the promise will resolve with that value. If the saga function throws an error, the promise will be rejected with that error. For example:

import { call, takeEvery }        from 'redux-saga/effects'
import { promises as fsPromises } from 'fs'
import { implementPromiseAction } from '@adobe/redux-saga-promise'

import myAction from './myAction'

//
// Asynchronously read a file, resolving the promise with the file's
// contents, or rejecting the promise if the file can't be read.
//
function * handleMyAction (action) {
  yield call(implementPromiseAction, action, function * () {
    // 
    // Implemented as a simple wrapper around fsPromises.readFile.
    // Rejection happens implicilty if fsPromises.readFile fails.
    //
    const { path } = action.payload
    return yield call(fsPromises.readFile, path, { encoding: 'utf8' })
  })
}

export function * rootSaga () {
  yield takeEvery(myAction, handleMyAction)
})

If you call implementPromiseAction() with a first argument that is not a promise action, it will throw an error (see Argument Validation below).

resolvePromiseAction(action, value)

Sometimes you may want finer control, or want to be more explicit when you know an operation won't fail. This helper causes the promise to resolve with the passed value. For example:

import { call, delay, takeEvery } from 'redux-saga/effects'
import { resolvePromiseAction }   from '@adobe/redux-saga-promise'

import myAction from './myAction'

//
// Delay a given number of seconds then resolve with the given value.
//
function * handleMyAction (action) {
  const { seconds, value } = action.payload
  yield delay(seconds*1000)
  yield call(resolvePromiseAction, action, value)
}

function * rootSaga () {
  yield takeEvery(myAction, handleMyAction)
})

If you call resolvePromiseAction() with a first argument that is not a promise action, it will throw an error (see Argument Validation below).

rejectPromiseAction(action, value)

Sometimes you may want finer control, or want to explicitly fail without needing to throw. This helper causes the promise to reject with the passed value, which typically should be an Error. For example:

import { call, takeEvery }     from 'redux-saga/effects'
import { rejectPromiseAction } from '@adobe/redux-saga-promise'

import myAction from './myAction'

//
// TODO: Implement this!   Failing for now
//
function * handleMyAction (action) {
  yield call(rejectPromiseAction, action, new Error("Sorry, myAction is not implemented yet")
}

function * rootSaga () {
  yield takeEvery(myAction, handleMyAction)
})

If you call rejectPromiseAction() with a first argument that is not a promise action, it will throw an error (see Argument Validation below).

Action lifecycle -- reducing the promise action:

Commonly you want the redux store to reflect the status of a promise action: whether it's pending, what the resolved value is, or what the rejected error is.

Behind the scenes, myAction = createPromiseAction('MY_ACTION') actually creates a suite of three actions:

  • myAction.trigger: An alias for myAction, which is what you dispatch that then creates the promise.

  • myAction.resolved: Dispatched automatically by promiseMiddleware when the promise is resolved; its payload is the resolved value of the promise

  • myAction.rejected: Dispatched automatically by promiseMiddleware when the promise is rejected; its payload is the rejection error of the promise

You can easily use them in handleActions of redux-actions:

import { handleActions } from 'redux-actions'

import myAction from './myAction'

//
// For the readFile wrapper described above, we can keep track of the file in the store
//
export const reducer = handleActions({
    [myAction.trigger]:  (state, { payload: { path } }) => ({ ...state, file: { path, status: 'reading'} }),
    [myAction.resolved]: (state, { payload: contents }) => ({ ...state, file: { path: state.file.path, status: 'read', contents } }),
    [myAction.rejected]: (state, { payload: error })    => ({ ...state, file: { path: state.file.path, status: 'failed', error } }),
  }, {})

Dispatching a promise action in a saga

In the sagas that perform your business logic, you may at times want to dispatch a promise action and wait for it to resolve. You can do that using redux-saga's putResolve Effect:

const result = yield putResolve(myPromiseAction)

This dispatches the action and waits for the promise to resolve, returning the resolved value. Or if the promise rejects it will bubble up an error.

Caution! If you use put() instead of putResolve(), the saga will continue execution immediately without waiting for the promise to resolve.

Helper for dispatching actions in sagas

TL;dr: The dispatch() helper is entirely optional. You can ignore this section. But for sagas that dispatch promise actions, you can use it if you think it will make your code cleaner or more robust.

In sagas that perform your business logic if you dispatch a mix of ordinary actions and promise actions, you must remember use put() vs putResolve() appropriately. E.g., you might have:

import { call, put, putResolve } from 'redux-saga/effects'

function * myBusinessLogic () {
  yield putResolve(myPromiseAction({ c:3, d: 4 })) // Wait for promise to resolve
  yield put(someOrdinaryAction({ a: 1, b: 2}))     // Don't wait
  yield call(someAsyncFunction, { e: 5 })          // Waits for promise to resolve
  yield call(someOrdinaryFunction, { f: 6 })       // Doesn't wait
}

Unfortunately it's easy to accidentally use put() instead of putResolve() which means the saga will immediately continue without waiting for your promise to resolve -- in many cases causing subtle errors. (Voice of experience here!)

To avoid that error, and for consistency, redux-saga-promise provides an "effect creator" named dispatch. Use it via:

  • yield dispatch(action), passing an action
  • yield dispatch(actionCreator, ...args), passing an actionCreator and optional args, which dispatch() will to produce an action.

The behavior mimics that of call() -- if the action is a promise action, yield dispatch() will dispatch it and block until the promise resolves then return the resolved value (or will bubble up an error if the promise rejects). For any other action, yield dispatch() will simply dispatch it normally and return whatever store.dispatch returns.

This lets you use yield dispatch(action, ...args) everywhere to dispatch actions, like you can use yield call(function, ...args) to call functions. You then doesn't need to worry about which actions are promise actions and which aren't. I.e. the above saga then becomes:

import { call }     from 'redux-saga/effects'
import { dispatch } from '@adobe/redux-saga-promise'

function * myBusinessLogic () {
  yield dispatch(myPromiseAction, { c:3, d: 4 })    // Waits for promise to resolve
  yield dispatch(someOrdinaryAction, { a: 1, b: 2}) // Doesn't wait
  yield call(someAsyncFunction, { e: 5 })           // Waits for promise to resolve
  yield call(someOrdinaryFunction, { f: 6 })        // Doesn't wait
}

Behind the scenes, dispatch() simply returns put(action) or putResolve(action) based on whether the action was created by createPromiseAction.

If you call dispatch() with a first argument that is null, or the first argument is not a function but you provide extra ...args anyway, it will throw an error (see Argument Validation below)

Argument Validation

To avoid accidental confusion, all the helper functions validate their arguments and will throw a custom Error subclass ArgumentError in case of error. This error will be bubbled up by redux-saga as usual, and as usual you can catch it in a saga otherwise it will will bubble up to the onError hook. If you want to, you can test the error type, e.g.:

import { applyMiddleware, compose, createStore } from 'redux'
import { ArgumentError, promiseMiddleware }      from '@adobe/redux-saga-promise'
import createSagaMiddleware                      from 'redux-saga'

// ...assuming rootReducer and rootSaga are defined
const sagaMiddleware = createSagaMiddleware({ onError: (error) => {
  if (error instanceof ArgumentError) {
    console.log('Oops, programmer error! I called redux-saga-promise incorrectly:', error)
  } else {
    // ...
  }
})
const store = createStore(rootReducer, {}, compose(applyMiddleware(promiseMiddleware, sagaMiddleware)))
sagaMiddleware.run(rootSaga)

Additionally, all the helper functions will throw a custom Error subclass ConfigurationError if promiseMiddleware was not properly included in the store.

Contributing

Contributions are welcomed! Read the Contributing Guide for more information.

Building & Testing

package.json defines the usual scripts:

  • npm build: transpiles the source, placing the result in dist/index.js
  • npm test: builds, and then runs the test suite.

The tests are written using the AVA test runner.

Licensing

This project is licensed under the Apache V2 License. See LICENSE for more information.

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